Examples

Let’s dive right in to some example code.

(A runnable notebook version of this examples page is included in the notebooks subdirectory of the poppy source, or is available from here.)

For all of the following examples, you will have more informative text output when running the code if you first enable Python’s logging mechanism to display log messages to screen:

import logging
logging.basicConfig(level=logging.DEBUG)

A simple circular pupil

This is very simple, as it should be:

osys = poppy.OpticalSystem()
osys.add_pupil( poppy.CircularAperture(radius=3))    # pupil radius in meters
osys.add_detector(pixelscale=0.010, fov_arcsec=5.0)  # image plane coordinates in arcseconds

psf = osys.calc_psf(2e-6)                            # wavelength in microns
poppy.display_PSF(psf, title='The Airy Function')
Sample calculation result

A complex segmented pupil

By combining multiple analytic optics together it is possible to create quite complex pupils:

ap = poppy.MultiHexagonAperture(rings=3, flattoflat=2)           # 3 rings of 2 m segments yields 14.1 m circumscribed diameter
sec = poppy.SecondaryObscuration(secondary_radius=1.5, n_supports=4, support_width=0.1)   # secondary with spiders
atlast = poppy.CompoundAnalyticOptic( opticslist=[ap, sec], name='Mock ATLAST')           # combine into one optic

atlast.display(npix=1024, colorbar_orientation='vertical')
Sample calculation result

And here’s the PSF:

osys = poppy.OpticalSystem()
osys.add_pupil(atlast)
osys.add_detector(pixelscale=0.010, fov_arcsec=2.0)
psf = osys.calc_psf(1e-6)

poppy.display_PSF(psf, title="Mock ATLAST PSF")
Sample calculation result

Multiple defocused PSFs

Defocus can be added using a lens:

wavelen=1e-6
nsteps = 4
psfs = []
for nwaves in range(nsteps):

    osys = poppy.OpticalSystem("test", oversample=2)
    osys.add_pupil( poppy.CircularAperture(radius=3))    # pupil radius in meters
    osys.add_pupil( poppy.ThinLens(nwaves=nwaves, reference_wavelength=wavelen, radius=3))
    osys.add_detector(pixelscale=0.01, fov_arcsec=4.0)

    psf = osys.calc_psf(wavelength=wavelen)
    psfs.append(psf)

    plt.subplot(1,nsteps, nwaves+1)
    poppy.display_PSF(psf, title='Defocused by {0} waves'.format(nwaves),
        colorbar_orientation='horizontal')
Sample calculation result

Band Limited Coronagraph with Off-Axis Source

As an example of a more complicated calculation, here’s a NIRCam-style band limited coronagraph with the source not precisely centered:

oversample=2
pixelscale = 0.010  #arcsec/pixel
wavelength = 4.6e-6

osys = poppy.OpticalSystem("test", oversample=oversample)
osys.add_pupil(poppy.CircularAperture(radius=6.5/2))
osys.add_image()
osys.add_image(poppy.BandLimitedCoron(kind='circular',  sigma=5.0))
osys.add_pupil()
osys.add_pupil(poppy.CircularAperture(radius=6.5/2))
osys.add_detector(pixelscale=pixelscale, fov_arcsec=3.0)

osys.source_offset_theta = 45.
osys.source_offset_r =  0.1  # arcsec
psf = osys.calc_psf(wavelength=wavelength, display_intermediates=True)
Sample calculation result

FQPM coronagraph

Four quadrant phase mask coronagraphs are a bit more complicated because one needs to ensure proper alignment of the FFT result with the center of the phase mask. This is done using a virtual optic called an ‘FQPM FFT aligner’ as follows:

optsys = poppy.OpticalSystem()
optsys.add_pupil( poppy.CircularAperture( radius=3, pad_factor=1.5)) #pad display area by 50%
optsys.add_pupil( poppy.FQPM_FFT_aligner())   # ensure the PSF is centered on the FQPM cross hairs
optsys.add_image()  # empty image plane for "before the mask"
optsys.add_image( poppy.IdealFQPM(wavelength=2e-6))
optsys.add_pupil( poppy.FQPM_FFT_aligner(direction='backward'))  # undo the alignment tilt after going back to the pupil plane
optsys.add_pupil( poppy.CircularAperture( radius=3)) # Lyot mask - change radius if desired
optsys.add_detector(pixelscale=0.01, fov_arcsec=10.0)


psf = optsys.calc_psf(wavelength=2e-6, display_intermediates=True)
Sample calculation result

FQPM on an Obscured Aperture (demonstrates compound optics)

As a variation, we can add a secondary obscuration. This can be done by creating a compound optic consisting of the circular outer aperture plus an opaque circular obscuration. The latter we can make using the InverseTransmission class.

primary = poppy.CircularAperture( radius=3)
secondary = poppy.InverseTransmission( poppy.CircularAperture(radius=0.5) )
aperture = poppy.CompoundAnalyticOptic( opticslist = [primary, secondary] )

optsys = poppy.OpticalSystem()
optsys.add_pupil( aperture)
optsys.add_pupil( poppy.FQPM_FFT_aligner())   # ensure the PSF is centered on the FQPM cross hairs
optsys.add_image( poppy.IdealFQPM(wavelength=2e-6))
optsys.add_pupil( poppy.FQPM_FFT_aligner(direction='backward'))  # undo the alignment tilt after going back to the pupil plane
optsys.add_pupil( poppy.CircularAperture( radius=3)) # Lyot mask - change radius if desired
optsys.add_detector(pixelscale=0.01, fov_arcsec=10.0)

optsys.display()

psf = optsys.calc_psf(wavelength=2e-6, display_intermediates=True)
Sample calculation result

Semi-analytic Coronagraph Calculations

In some cases, coronagraphy calculations can be sped up significantly using the semi-analytic algorithm of Soummer et al. This is implemented by first creating an OpticalSystem as usual, and then casting it to a SemiAnalyticCoronagraph class (which has a special customized propagation method implementing the alternate algorithm):

The following code performs the same calculation both ways and compares their speeds:

radius = 6.5/2
lyot_radius = 6.5/2.5
pixelscale = 0.060

osys = poppy.OpticalSystem("test", oversample=8)
osys.add_pupil( poppy.CircularAperture(radius=radius), name='Entrance Pupil')
osys.add_image( poppy.CircularOcculter(radius = 0.1) )
osys.add_pupil( poppy.CircularAperture(radius=lyot_radius), name='Lyot Pupil')
osys.add_detector(pixelscale=pixelscale, fov_arcsec=5.0)


plt.figure(1)
sam_osys = poppy.SemiAnalyticCoronagraph(osys, oversample=8, occulter_box=0.15)

import time
t0s = time.time()
psf_sam = sam_osys.calc_psf(display_intermediates=True)
t1s = time.time()

plt.figure(2)
t0f = time.time()
psf_fft = osys.calc_psf(display_intermediates=True)
t1f = time.time()

plt.figure(3)
plt.clf()
plt.subplot(121)
poppy.utils.display_PSF(psf_fft, title="FFT")
plt.subplot(122)
poppy.utils.display_PSF(psf_sam, title="SAM")

print "Elapsed time, FFT:  %.3s" % (t1f-t0f)
print "Elapsed time, SAM:  %.3s" % (t1s-t0s)
Sample calculation result

On my circa-2010 Mac Pro, the results are dramatic:

Elapsed time, FFT:  62.
Elapsed time, SAM:  4.1

Shifting and rotating optics

All AnalyticOpticalElements support arbitrary shifts and rotations of the optic. Set the shift_x, shift_y or rotation attributes. The shifts are given in meters for pupil plane optics, or arcseconds for image plane optics.

For instance we can demonstrate the shift invariance of PSFs:

ap_regular = poppy.CircularAperture(radius=2, pad_factor=1.5)  # pad_factor is important here - without it you will
ap_shifted = poppy.CircularAperture(radius=2, pad_factor=1.5)  # crop off part of the circle outside the array.
ap_shifted.shift_x =-0.75
ap_shifted.shift_y = 0.25

plt.figure(figsize=(6,6))

for optic, title, i in [(ap_regular, 'Unshifted', 1), (ap_shifted, 'Shifted', 3)]:

    sys = poppy.OpticalSystem()
    sys.add_pupil(optic)
    sys.add_detector(0.010, fov_pixels=100)
    psf = sys.calc_psf()

    ax1 = plt.subplot(2,2,i)
    optic.display(nrows=2, colorbar=False, ax=ax1)
    ax1.set_title(title+' pupil')
    ax2 = plt.subplot(2,2,i+1)
    poppy.display_PSF(psf,ax=ax2, colorbar=False)
    ax2.set_title(title+' PSF')
Sample calculation result

In addition to setting the attributes as shown in the above example, these options can be set directly in the initialization of such elements:

ap = poppy.RectangleAperture(rotation=30, shift_x=0.1)
ap.display(colorbar=False)
Sample calculation result